fbpx
Join the Greene Resources Talent Network

Greene Resources

Give us a call: 800-784-9619

How To Find Your Dream Job

Job Candidate engaged in interview

These days, there are plenty of job opportunities and the demand for talent exceeds supply.  However, this does not mean those opportunities are the right ones for you.  Landing your career of choice requires strategy- preparation, creativity, diving deep into your network, or building your network, and treating your job search as a full-time job in and of itself.   The following steps will help you find your dream job.

 

Identify your gifts

To create better success in your job search, first take the time to identify your gifts.

What do you LIKE to do? What do you do WELL? What do you want to LEARN and keep on learning?

Create three columns and list your answers, being as specific and creative as you can.  As you create the lists, begin to think more in terms of why an employer should hire you.  The key is to know (or be able to imagine) what a potential employer may need.

 

Develop a Target List.

Second, you will want to begin to develop a target list of potential employers.  You can enter keywords from your list on job sites along with geographic areas and see what types of companies have those keywords in their job descriptions.  These might include opportunities in industries or jobs about which you have not previously thought.

Start with one industry at a time.  List the roles for which your strengths, abilities, and experiences are best suited.  Then, list the companies that hire for those positions whether they have current openings or not. 

Outline the quantifiable impact you can make performing these jobs at these companies. What are your measurable accomplishments? In essence, you are creating a case study of why you are the best applicant for such a position.

In the end, you are defining the perfect job, the perfect type of industry and company, and the perfect location. For example:

  • Mechanical Engineer at a scientific instrumentation company specializing in gas chromatography
  • Events Coordinator for a chamber of commerce in the Triangle
  • Online Researcher for a law firm specializing in patents and trademarks

If you don’t know what you want to do, try starting with The O-Net Interest Profiler “My Next Move,” which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor:

https://www.mynextmove.org/explore/ip

 

Identify and Research Target Companies

A part of the previous step was identifying specific companies.  Continue to do this, identifying and researching target companies.  Which employers match your ideal profile?  List their name, location, industry, and any other information you find.  If your target matches a previous employer, then add that firm’s competitors to the list.  Research the target industry to add more companies to the list.  Some resources to help you do this include:

Alumni Associations

Job Openings/Job Boards (Indeed)        

Social Media (LinkedIn, Facebook)

Search engines (Google)

Recruiters

Personal, Social and Business Networks

Chambers of Commerce

Newspapers/Publications/Libraries

Nonprofit organizations

 

Start investigating the companies in depth.  You’ll need to know as much as you can about the company, products, services, customers, competitors, technologies used and the challenges the company faces. You’ll be trying to answer three questions:

  • Is this company a good fit for me?
  • What are the employer’s needs?
  • How can I present myself to meet those needs?
  • Who are the key decision makers and influencers – what is important to each of them?

By defining your gifts, creating a target list, and researching ideal companies, you are positioning yourself for success in your career search. At Greene Resources, our recruiters are here to help you in your job search- from defining your gifts, identifying target companies, to perfecting your resume, we’re always one phone call away from helping you get one step closer to your dream career.

Check back next week for our advice on getting your foot in the door.

Comments are closed.